RockHoundBlog

Naica Crystal Cave/Mine

Filed under: Video,regular postings — Gary May 30, 2010 @ 2:13 pm
Selenite crystals from Naica mine.

Selenite crystals from Naica mine.

Naica Mine

The Naica Mine of the Mexican state of Chihuahua is a working mine that is known for its extraordinary selenite crystals. Located in Naica in the municipality of Saucillo, Naica is a lead, zinc and silver mine in which large voids have been found, containing crystals of selenite (gypsum) as large as 4 feet (1.2 m) in diameter and 36 feet (11 m) long.

Cave of the Crystals

Green_fluorite

Green fluorite framed by white calcite, Naica Mine, mined in the 1980s. Size: 5.5 x 5.1 x 4.4 cm.

The Cave of Crystals (Cueva de los Cristales) is a chamber approximately 1,000 feet (300 m) down in the limestone host rock of the mine. The chamber contains giant selenite crystals, some of the largest natural crystals ever found. The selenite crystals were formed by hydrothermal fluids emanating from the magma chambers below. The cavern was discovered while the miners were drilling through the Naica fault, which they were worried would flood the mine.

The Cave of Swords

The Cave of Swords is another chamber in the Naica Mine, also containing gypsum crystals but each only about a yard (a meter) long.

Cave of the Crystals or Giant Crystal Cave (Spanish: Cueva de los Cristales) is a cave connected to the Naica Mine 300 metres (980 ft) deep in Chihuahua, Mexico. The main chamber contains giant selenite crystals, some of the largest natural crystals ever found. The cave’s largest crystal found to date is 11 m (36 ft) in length, 4 m (13 ft) in diameter and 55 tons in weight. The cave is 27 m (89 ft) in length and 9 m (30 ft) in width. The cave is extremely hot with air temperatures reaching up to 58 °C (136 °F) with 90 to 100 percent humidity. The cave is relatively unexplored due to the extreme temperatures and high humidity. Without proper protection people can only endure approximately ten minutes of exposure at a time.

Cave of the Crystals

Cave of the Crystals

Discovery

The cave was discovered in 2000 by miners excavating a new tunnel for the Industrias Peñoles mining company located in Naica, Mexico while miners were drilling through the Naica fault, which they were worried would flood the mine. The mining complex in Naica contains some of the world’s largest deposits of silver, zinc, and lead.

The Cave of Crystals is a horseshoe-shaped cavity in limestone rock. Its floor is covered in perfectly faceted crystalline blocks, and huge crystal beams jut out from both the blocks and the floor. The only reason people can get into the caves today is because the mining company’s pumping operations keep the cave clear of water. If the pumping would be stopped, the caves will again be submerged.

In 1910 miners discovered another cavern beneath Naica, the Cave of Swords. It is located over the Cave of Crystals and contains spectacular, but smaller crystals. It is speculated that transition temperatures may have fallen much more rapidly, leading to an end in the growth of the crystals.

Formation of the crystals

Naica lies on an ancient fault and there is an underground magma chamber below the cave. The magma heated the ground water and it became saturated with minerals, including large quantities of gypsum. The hollow space of the cave was filled with this mineral rich hot water and remained filled for about 500,000 years. During this time, the temperature of the water remained very stable at over 50°C. This allowed microscopic crystals to form and grow. They continued to grow to immense sizes.

Igneous Rocks

Filed under: regular postings — Gary @ 1:41 pm
Map of world geologic provinces

Map of world geologic provinces

Etymology

The word “igneous” is derived from the Latin ignis, meaning “of fire”. Volcanic rocks are named after Vulcan, the Roman name for the god of fire.
Intrusive rocks are also called plutonic rocks, named after Pluto, the Roman god of the underworld.

Igneous rock (derived from the Latin word “Igneus” meaning of fire, from “Ignis” meaning fire) is one of the three main rock types, the others being sedimentary and metamorphic rock. Igneous rock is formed through the cooling and solidification of magma or lava. Igneous rock may form with or without crystallization, either below the surface as intrusive (plutonic) rocks or on the surface as extrusive (volcanic) rocks. This magma can be derived from partial melts of pre-existing rocks in either a planet’s mantle or crust. Typically, the melting is caused by one or more of three processes: an increase in temperature, a decrease in pressure, or a change in composition. Over 700 types of igneous rocks have been described, most of them having formed beneath the surface of Earth’s crust. These have diverse properties, depending on their composition and how they were formed.

Geological significance

The upper 16 kilometres (10 mi) of Earth’s crust is composed of approximately 95% igneous rocks with only a thin, widespread covering of sedimentary and metamorphic rocks.

Igneous rocks are geologically important because:

  • their minerals and global chemistry give information about the composition of the mantle, from which some igneous rocks are extracted, and the temperature and pressure conditions that allowed this extraction, and/or of other pre-existing rock that melted;
  • their absolute ages can be obtained from various forms of radiometric dating and thus can be compared to adjacent geological strata, allowing a time sequence of events;
  • their features are usually characteristic of a specific tectonic environment, allowing tectonic reconstitutions (see plate tectonics);
  • in some special circumstances they host important mineral deposits (ores): for example, tungsten, tin, and uranium are commonly associated with granites and diorites, whereas ores of chromium and platinum are commonly associated with gabbros.

Intrusive igneous rocks

Indian_Granite

Indian_Granite

Intrusive igneous rocks are formed from magma that cools and solidifies within the crust of a planet. Surrounded by pre-existing rock (called country rock), the magma cools slowly, and as a result these rocks are coarse grained. The mineral grains in such rocks can generally be identified with the naked eye. Intrusive rocks can also be classified according to the shape and size of the intrusive body and its relation to the other formations into which it intrudes. Typical intrusive formations are batholiths, stocks, laccoliths, sills and dikes.

The central cores of major mountain ranges consist of intrusive igneous rocks, usually granite. When exposed by erosion, these cores (called batholiths) may occupy huge areas of the Earth’s surface.

Coarse grained intrusive igneous rocks which form at depth within the crust are termed as abyssal; intrusive igneous rocks which form near the surface are termed hypabyssal.

Extrusive igneous rocks

Basalt

Basalt (an extrusive igneous rock in this case); light coloured tracks show the direction of lava flow.

Extrusive igneous rocks are formed at the crust’s surface as a result of the partial melting of rocks within the mantle and crust. Extrusive Igneous rocks cool and solidify quicker than intrusive igneous rocks. Since the rocks cool very quickly they are fine grained.

The melt, with or without suspended crystals and gas bubbles, is called magma. Magma rises because it is less dense than the rock from which it was created. When it reaches the surface, magma extruded onto the surface either beneath water or air, is called lava. Eruptions of volcanoes into air are termed subaerial whereas those occurring underneath the ocean are termed submarine. Black smokers and mid-ocean ridge basalt are examples of submarine volcanic activity.

The volume of extrusive rock erupted annually by volcanoes varies with plate tectonic setting. Extrusive rock is produced in the following proportions:

  • divergent boundary: 73%
  • convergent boundary (subduction zone): 15%
  • hotspot: 12%.

Magma which erupts from a volcano behaves according to its viscosity, determined by temperature, composition, and crystal content. High-temperature magma, most of which is basaltic in composition, behaves in a manner similar to thick oil and, as it cools, treacle. Long, thin basalt flows with pahoehoe surfaces are common. Intermediate composition magma such as andesite tends to form cinder cones of intermingled ash, tuff and lava, and may have viscosity similar to thick, cold molasses or even rubber when erupted. Felsic magma such as rhyolite is usually erupted at low temperature and is up to 10,000 times as viscous as basalt. Volcanoes with rhyolitic magma commonly erupt explosively, and rhyolitic lava flows typically are of limited extent and have steep margins, because the magma is so viscous.

Felsic and intermediate magmas that erupt often do so violently, with explosions driven by release of dissolved gases — typically water but also carbon dioxide. Explosively erupted pyroclastic material is called tephra and includes tuff, agglomerate and ignimbrite. Fine volcanic ash is also erupted and forms ash tuff deposits which can often cover vast areas.

Because lava cools and crystallizes rapidly, it is fine grained. If the cooling has been so rapid as to prevent the formation of even small crystals after extrusion, the resulting rock may be mostly glass (such as the rock obsidian). If the cooling of the lava happened slowly, the rocks would be coarse-grained.

Because the minerals are mostly fine-grained, it is much more difficult to distinguish between the different types of extrusive igneous rocks than between different types of intrusive igneous rocks. Generally, the mineral constituents of fine-grained extrusive igneous rocks can only be determined by examination of thin sections of the rock under a microscope, so only an approximate classification can usually be made in the field.

Hypabyssal igneous rocks

Hypabyssal igneous rocks are formed at a depth in between the plutonic and volcanic rocks. Hypabyssal rocks are less common than plutonic or volcanic rocks and do often form dikes, sills or laccoliths.

Classification

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Rock and Mineral shows for June

Filed under: Coming Events — Gary @ 1:03 pm

JUNE 2010:

4-5–PRICE, UTAH: 4th annual show, “Castle Country Rock, Fossil & Mineral Show”; Braun Lapidary, CEU Silversmith [Lapidary & Wire Wrapping Classes]; Jennifer Leavitt Student Center, College of Eastern Utah, 536 North 300 East; Fri. 10-7, Sat. 10-7; free admission; rocks, fossils, minerals, jewelry, metal detectors, equipment, beads, displays, door prizes; contact Patrick Braun, P.O. Box 236, Ferron, UT 84523, (435) 384-2211; e-mail: pbraun@cskyw.net

4-6–LAS VEGAS, NEVADA: Business-to-business gem trade show; Gem & Lapidary Wholesalers Inc.; Bally’s Las Vegas Hotel & Casino, Pacific Ballroom, 3645 Las Vegas Blvd. S; Fri. 10-6, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 10-3; contact G&LW, P.O. Box 98, Flora, MS 39071-0098, (601) 879-8832; e-mail: info@glwshows.com; Web site: glwshows.com

4-6–PUYALLUP, WASHINGTON: Show; Puyallup Valley Gem & Mineral Club; Fruitland Grange, 112th St. and 86th Ave. E; Fri. 12-6, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 11-4; contact Mark Baumann, (253) 756-8636; e-mail: djbmeb@earthlink.net

4-6–SAN MATEO, CALIFORNIA: Show; International Gem & Jewelry Show Inc.; San Mateo County Event Center, 2495 S. Delaware; Fri. 12-6, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 11-5; adults $8; open to the public, professional jewelers, artists; International Gem & Jewelry Show Inc., 120 Derwood Circle, Rockville, MD 20850, (301) 294-1640; e-mail: info@intergem.net; Web site: www.InterGem.com

4-6–TULSA, OKLAHOMA: Show, “Gem Faire”; Gem Faire Inc.; Expo Square/Central Park Hall, 4145 E. 21st St.; Fri. 12-7, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 10-5; $5 weekend pass; contact Yooy Nelson, (503) 252-8300; e-mail: info@gemfaire.com; Web site: www.gemfaire.com

4-6–WAUSEON, OHIO: Show; State Line Gem & Mineral Society; Fulton County (Ohio) Fair Grounds, 8514 SR 108, Ohio Turnpike Exit 34; Fri. 12-7, Sat. 10-7, Sun. 11-4; free admission; MSHA mine safety class Sat., ($30 includes book), soapstone carving class ($15 includes soapstone), beaded jewelry class, demonstrations (cabochon cutting and polishing, flint knapping, silver casting), micro mounts and sand, fluorescent minerals, wire wrapping, spool knitting, faceting, glass fusing, kids’ grab bags, silent auctions, door prizes, raffle; contact Doris Brzezicki, 419 N. Broad St., Adrian, MI 49221, (517) 263-1669; e-mail: rychard@tc3net.com; Web site: www.angelfire.com/mac/rock-club/

5–DELTA, COLORADO: Show; Delta County Rock Wranglers; Heddles Recreation Center, 530 Gunnison River Dr.; Sat. 9-5; free admission; dealers, exhibits, door prizes, family activities; contact Harry W. Masinton, (970) 856-3861

5–MURFREESBORO, ARKANSAS: Show, “Crater Gem & Mineral Show”; Crater of Diamonds State Park; 209 State Park Rd.; Sat. 8-4; free admission; gems, minerals, jewelry, diamond search area adults $7, children $4); contact Margi Jenks, 209 State Park Rd., Murfreesboro, AR 71958, (870) 285-3116; e-mail: margaret.jenks@arkansas.gov; Web site: www.craterofdiamondsstatepark.com

5-6–BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA: 37th annual show, “Tannehill Gem, Mineral, Fossil, & Jewelry Show”; Alabama Mineral & Lapidary Society; Tannehill Ironworks Historical State Park, 12632 Confederate Pkwy.; Sat. 9-5, Sun. 9-5; adults $3, seniors and ages 6-12 $2, kids under 6 free; door prizes, children’s activities, educational exhibits, demonstrations; contact Gene Blackerby, 155 Hwy. 69, Chelsea, AL 35043, (205) 807-6777; e-mail: gene@lapidaryclub.com; Web site: http://lapidaryclub.com

5-6–COEUR d’ALENE, IDAHO: Show; North Idaho Mineral Club; Kootenai Co. Fairgrounds and Event Center, Kathleen and Government Way; Sat. 9-5, Sun. 10-4; contact Warren Price, P.O. Box 1643, Hayden, ID 83835; e-mail: genuniegems@gmail.com

5-6–MARION, KENTUCKY: Show; Ben E. Clement Mineral Museum, Fohs Hall, Walker St.; Sat. 9-5, Sun. 11-5; free admission; mineral digs, museum tours, vendors, speakers, silent auctions, door prizes, children’s activities; contact Tina Walker, P.O. Box 391, Marion, KY 42064, (270) 965-4263; e-mail: beclement@kynet.biz; Web site: http://clementmineralmuseum.org

5-6–VIROQUA, WISCONSIN: Show; Coulee Rock Club, Viroqua Rotary; Viroqua Jr. High School Gym, 100 Blackhawk Dr.; Sat. 10-5, Sun. 10-4; free admission; contact Gary Krause, 606 E. Court St., Viroqua, WI 54665, (608) 637-2574; e-mail: garyjkrause@yahoo.com; Web site: www.garysrockshop.net

6–FT. LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA: Show, “Rings & Things BeadTour”; Rings & Things; Sheraton – Cypress Creek, 555 NW 62nd St.; Sun. 1-5; free admission; gemstones, bead strands, wholesale prices, findings, stringing supplies; contact Dave Robertson, P.O. Box 450, Spokane, WA 99210, (800) 366-2156; e-mail: drobertson@rings-things.com; Web site: www.rings-things.com

5-6–GLENDORA, CALIFORNIA: Show; Glendora GEMS; Goddard Middle School; 859 E. Sierra Madre; Sat. 10-5, Sun. 10-4; free admission; dealers, demonstrations, displays, door prizes; contact Bonnie Bidwell, 1010 E. Mountain View, Glendora, CA 91741, (626) 963-4638; e-mail: ybidwell2@aol.com

8–TAMPA, FLORIDA: Show, “Rings & Things BeadTour”; Rings & Things; Clarion, 2701 E. Fowler Ave.; Tue. 12-4; free admission; gemstones, bead strands, wholesale prices, findings, stringing supplies; contact Dave Robertson, P.O. Box 450, Spokane, WA 99210, (800) 366-2156; e-mail: drobertson@rings-things.com; Web site: www.rings-things.com

10–JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA: Show, “Rings & Things BeadTour”; Rings & Things; Clarion Hotel Airport Conference Center (Ballroom), 2101 Dixie Clipper Rd.; Thu. 1-5; free admission; gemstones, bead strands, wholesale prices, findings, stringing supplies; contact Dave Robertson, P.O. Box 450, Spokane, WA 99210, (800) 366-2156; e-mail: drobertson@rings-things.com; Web site: www.rings-things.com

10-12–PARK HILLS, MISSOURI: 13th annual swap and sale; Mineral Area Gem & Mineral Society; Greater St. Louis Association of Earth Science Clubs; Missouri Mines State Historic Site, Hwy. 32; Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-6, Sun. 9-5; free admission; rocks, minerals, fossils, lapidary; contact Lloyd E. Marler, (573) 431-2951, or Missouri Mines State Historic Site, P.O. box 492, Park Hills, MO 63601, (573) 431-6226

11-12–REDWOOD FALLS, MINNESOTA: Show and sale; New Ulm Gem & Mineral Club, Minnesota Inventors Congress; Redwood Area Community Center, 901 Cook St.; Fri. 11-6, Sat. 11-6; club displays, grab bags, jewelry, rocks, amethyst, demonstrations, door prizes; contact Ruth Hacker, P.O. Box 37, Morgan, MN 56266, (507) 249-3811

11-13–ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO: Show, “Gem Faire”; Gem Faire Inc.; New Mexico State Fairgrounds, 300 San Pedro NE; Fri. 12-7, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 10-5; $5 weekend pass; contact Yooy Nelson, (503) 252-8300; e-mail: info@gemfaire.com; Web site: www.gemfaire.com

11-13–HOUSTON, TEXAS: Show; International Gem & Jewelry Show Inc.; Reliant Center at Reliant Park, 1 Reliant Park; Fri. 12-6, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 11-5; adults $8; open to the public, professional jewelers, artists; contact International Gem & Jewelry Show Inc., 120 Derwood Circle, Rockville, MD 20850, (301) 294-1640; e-mail: info@intergem.net; Web site: www.InterGem.com

11-13–OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS: Show; International Gem & Jewelry Show Inc.; Overland Park Convention Center, 6000 College Blvd.; Fri. 12-6, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 11-5; adults $8; open to the public, professional jewelers, artists; contact International Gem & Jewelry Show Inc., 120 Derwood Circle, Rockville, MD 20850, (301) 294-1640; e-mail: info@intergem.net; Web site: www.InterGem.com

11-13–RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA: Show; Frank Cox Productions; State Fairgrounds, 1025 Blue Ridge Rd.; Fri. 10-5, Sat. 10-5, Sun. 10-5; gems, jewelry, beads; contact Frank Cox Productions, 755 S. Palm Ave. #203, Sarasota, FL 34236, (941) 954-0202; e-mail: frankcox@comcast.net; Web site: www.frankcoxproductions.com

12–KENT, CONNECTICUT: 8th annual show; Connecticut Antique Machinery Association, Danbury Mineralogical Society; museum grounds, 1 mile north of Kent on Rte. 7; Sat. 9-4; free admission; rocks, minerals, fossils, jewelry, buy and trade, new mining museum exhibits; contact Connecticut Antique Machinery Association, (860) 927-0050; Web site: www.ctamachinery.com

12–NORCROSS (ATLANTA), GEORGIA: Show, “Rings & Things BeadTour”; Rings & Things; Holiday Inn Select – Peachtree Corners, 6050 Peachtree Industrial Blvd. NW; Sat. 12-4; free admission; gemstones, bead strands, wholesale prices, findings, stringing supplies; contact Dave Robertson, P.O. Box 450, Spokane, WA 99210, (800) 366-2156; e-mail: drobertson@rings-things.com; Web site: www.rings-things.com

12–SKOKIE, ILLINOIS: 3rd annual show, “Geode Fest”; Chicago Rocks & Minerals Society; St. Peter’s United Church of Christ – Gymnasium, 8013 Laramie Ave.; Sat. 1-5; free admission; geodes from Iowa, Missouri, Indiana, Mexico, Brazil, etc., geode cracking, dealers, educational exhibits, mineral inclusion identification; contact Craig Heinze, (847) 584-8637; e-mail: cheinze@flash.net; Web site: www.chicagorocks.org

12-13–BARTO, PENNSYLVANIA: 3rd annual show, “Pennsylvania Prospector Mineral and Fossil Show”; Joshua Sloan; Jake’s Flea Market, 1380 Rte. 100; Sat. 7-1, Sun. 7-1; free admission; free mineral samples and identification for kids and teachers; contact Joshua Sloan, P.O. Box 118, Bally, PA 19503, (484) 241-5490; e-mail: josh@paprospector.com; Web site: http://PaProspector.com

12-13–CARTERSVILLE, GEORGIA: Show, “Rockfest”; Tellus Science Museum; 100 Tellus Dr.; Sat. 9-5, Sun. 10-4; adults $12, seniors $10, students and children $8, museum members free; dealers, gems, minerals, fossils, jewelry, children’s activities, mineral identification, demonstrations; contact Michelle Pate, 100 Tellus Dr., Cartersville, GA 30120, (770) 606-5711; e-mail: michellep@tellusmuseum.org; Web site: www.tellusmuseum.org

12-13–SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA: Show, “San Francisco Crystal Fair”; Pacific Crystal Guild; 99 Marina Blvd.; Sat. 10-6, Sun. 10-4; admission $6; contact Jerry Tomlinson, (415) 383-7837; e-mail: sfxtl@earthlink.net; Web site: www.crystalfair.com

13–CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA: Show, “Rings & Things BeadTour”; Rings & Things; Renaissance Suites Hotel (Terrace Ballroom), 2800 Coliseum Centre Dr.; Sun. 2-6; free admission; gemstones, bead strands, wholesale prices, findings, stringing supplies; contact Dave Robertson, P.O. Box 450, Spokane, WA 99210, (800) 366-2156; e-mail: drobertson@rings-things.com; Web site: www.rings-things.com

14–DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA: Show, “Rings & Things BeadTour”; Rings & Things; Hilton Durham, 3800 Hillsborough Rd., near Duke University; Mon. 1-5; free admission; gemstones, bead strands, wholesale prices, findings, stringing supplies; contact Dave Robertson, (800) 366-2156; e-mail: drobertson@rings-things.com; Web site: www.rings-things.com

15–SPOKANE, WASHINGTON: Show, “Rings & Things BeadTour”; Rings & Things; Holiday Inn – Richmond Central, 3207 North Blvd.; Tue. 1-5; free admission; gemstones, bead strands, wholesale prices, findings, stringing supplies; contact Dave Robertson, (800) 366-2156; e-mail: drobertson@rings-things.com; Web site: www.rings-things.com

16–McLEAN, VIRGINIA: Show, “Rings & Things BeadTour”; Rings & Things; Best Western Tysons Westpark Hotel (Tyson’s 1 and 2), 8401 Westpark Dr.; Wed. 12-4; free admission; gemstones, bead strands, wholesale prices, findings, stringing supplies; contact Dave Robertson, (800) 366-2156; e-mail: drobertson@rings-things.com; Web site: www.rings-things.com

17–TIMONIUM, MARYLAND: Show, “Rings & Things BeadTour”; Rings & Things; Holiday Inn Timonium, 9615 Deereco Rd.; Thu. 1-5; free admission; gemstones, bead strands, wholesale prices, findings, stringing supplies; contact Dave Robertson, P.O. Box 450, Spokane, WA 99210, (800) 366-2156; e-mail: drobertson@rings-things.com; Web site: www.rings-things.com

18-20–ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA: Show, “Asheville Gem Fest”; Colburn Earth Science Museum; Pack Place Education, Arts & Science Center, 2 S. Pack Square; Fri. 10-6; Sat. 10-6, Sun. 11-5; free admission; kids’ activities, silent auction; contact Felicity Green, Colburn Earth Science Museum, P.O. Box 1617, Asheville, NC 28802, (828) 254-7162; e-mail: museum.colburn@gmail.com; Web site: www.colburnmuseum.org

18-20–NEWPORT, OREGON: 47th annual show, “Rock’n the Coast”; Oregon Coast Agate Club; Yaquina View Elementary School, Multipurpose Room, 351 S.E. Harney St.; Fri. 10-6, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 10-4:30; dealers, demonstrations, displays, agate, jasper, gems, fossils; contact K. Myers, (541) 265-2514

18-20–SANDY (SALT LAKE CITY), UTAH: Show, “Gem Faire”; Gem Faire Inc.; South Towne Exposition Center/Exhibit Hall 5, 9575 S. State St.; Fri. 12-7, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 10-5; $5 weekend pass; contact Yooy Nelson, (503) 252-8300; e-mail: info@gemfaire.com; Web site: www.gemfaire.com

18-20–SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA: Show; International Gem & Jewelry Show Inc.; Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St.; Fri. 12-6, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 11-5; adults $8; open to the public, professional jewelers, artists; contact International Gem & Jewelry Show Inc., 120 Derwood Circle, Rockville, MD 20850, (301) 294-1640; e-mail: info@intergem.net; Web site: www.InterGem.com

18-20–WHITTIER, CALIFORNIA: AFMS/CFMS show, “Hidden Treasures”; North Orange County Gem & Mineral Society, American Federation of Mineralogical Societies, California Federation of Mineralogical Societies; So. California University of Health Sciences, 16200 E. Amber Valley Rd. (www.scuhs.edu); Fri. 10-5, Sat. 10-5, Sun. 10-5; adults $6, children under 14 free; speakers, field trips, display cases, raffle, kids’ room, demonstrations, vendors, supplies, jewelry, beads, fossils, gems; contact Don Warthen, (626) 330-8974; e-mail: odwarthen@verizon.net; Web site: www.nocgms.com

19–ESSINGTON, PENNSYLVANIA: Show, “Rings & Things BeadTour”; Rings & Things; Wyndham, 46 Industrial Hwy.; Sat. 12-4; free admission; gemstones, bead strands, wholesale prices, findings, stringing supplies; contact Dave Robertson, (800) 366-2156; e-mail: drobertson@rings-things.com; Web site: www.rings-things.com

19-20–BUTTE, MONTANA: Annual show; Butte Mineral & Gem Club; Civic Center Annex, 1340 Harrison Ave. (exit 127 North); Sat. 10-5, Sun. 10-5; 15 dealers, minerals, gems, jewelry, fossils, displays, demonstrators; contact Pete Knudsen, P.O. Box 4492, Butte, MT 59702, (406) 496-4395

19-20–CAYUCOS, CALIFORNIA: 46th annual show; Cayucos Gem & Mineral Show; San Luis Obispo Gem & Mineral Club; Cayucos Vets Hall, 10 Cayucos Dr.; Sat. 9-5, Sun. 9-5; free admission; rocks, slabs, minerals, fossils, gems, carvings, lapidary epuipment, drawing; contact Mike Lyons,(805) 610-0757; e-mail: jadestar@charter.net

19-20–GEORGETOWN, INDIANA: 9th annual Open Treasure Hunt; Down’n Dirty Diggers, Mike’s Metal Detectors, Hoosier Hills Treasure Hunters Club; entry $60 ($70 after 6/1); two days of metal detecting, silver, token prizes, free kids’ (ages 7-12) hunt; contact Michael Byrn, 9350 Indian Bluff Rd., Georgetown, IN 47122, (812) 366-3558; e-mail: byrn@hughes.net

19-20–POWELL, WYOMING: Show, “Wyoming Wonders”; Shoshone Rock Club, Cody ’59ers; Park County Fairgrounds, 655 5th St.; Sat. 9-7, Sun. 9-4; adults $2, ages 12-18 $1, children 5th grade and under free with adult; contact Jane R. Neale, (307) 754-3285, Mary Ann Northrup, (307) 754-4472, or Art Schatz, (307) 548-7258

20–HANOVER, NEW JERSEY: Show, “Rings & Things BeadTour”; Rings & Things; Ramada Inn and Conference Center (Ballroom), 130 Rte. 10 W; Sun. 1-5; free admission; gemstones, bead strands, wholesale prices, findings, stringing supplies; contact Dave Robertson, (800) 366-2156; e-mail: drobertson@rings-things.com; Web site: www.rings-things.com

21–NORTH HAVEN, CONNECTICUT: Show, “Rings & Things BeadTour”; Rings & Things; Holiday Inn North Haven, Emerald Ballroom 1, 201 Washington Ave.; Mon. 1-5; free admission; gemstones, bead strands, wholesale prices, findings, stringing supplies; contact Dave Robertson, (800) 366-2156; e-mail: drobertson@rings-things.com; Web site: www.rings-things.com

24–ROCHESTER, NEW YORK: Show, “Rings & Things BeadTour”; Rings & Things; Monroe Community College, Brighton Campus, Bldg. #3, Monroe A & B, R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd.; Thu. 12-5; free admission; gemstones, bead strands, wholesale prices, findings, stringing supplies; contact Dave Robertson, (800) 366-2156; e-mail: drobertson@rings-things.com; Web site: www.rings-things.com

24-27–PRINEVILLE, OREGON: Show, “Prineville Rockhound Show and Pow Wow”; Prineville Rockhound Pow Wow Association; Crook County Fair Grounds, 1280 S. Main; Thu. 9-5, Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 9-4; free admission; auction, field trips; contact Rich Knight, 1709 SW Hunter Rd., Prineville, OR 97754, (541) 447-5298; e-mail: richknightr@yahoo.com

25-27–BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA: 45th annual show and swap; Lawrence County Rock Club; Monroe County 4-H Fairgrounds, from IN 37, go south on IN 45S for 1.2 miles, then right (west) on Airport Rd. for 0.7 mile; gems, jewelry, minerals, fossils, rocks, lapidary equipment, supplies, rockhound and prospecting supplies, 4-H project material, science project material; Fri. 10-6:30, Sat. 9-6:30, Sun. 10-4; contact Dave Treffinger, 13101 E. 250 N., Loogootee, IN 47553, (812) 295-3463; Web site: www.lawrencecountyrockclub.org

25-27–NOVI, MICHIGAN: Show; International Gem & Jewelry Show Inc.; Rock Financial Showplace, 46100 Grand River Rd.; Fri. 12-6, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 11-5; adults $8; open to the public, professional jewelers, artists; contact International Gem & Jewelry Show Inc., 120 Derwood Circle, Rockville, MD 20850, (301) 294-1640; e-mail: info@intergem.net; Web site: www.InterGem.com

25-27–SEATTLE, WASHINGTON: Show; International Gem & Jewelry Show Inc.; Seattle Center, Exhibition Hall & Northwest Rooms, 305 Mercer St.; Fri. 12-6, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 11-5; adults $8; open to the public, professional jewelers, artists; contact International Gem & Jewelry Show Inc., 120 Derwood Circle, Rockville, MD 20850, (301) 294-1640l; e-mail: info@intergem.net; Web site: www.InterGem.com

25-27–SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA: Show, “Gem Faire”; Gem Faire Inc.; Scottish Rite Event Center, 1895 Camino del Rio S; Fri. 12-7, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 10-5; $5 weekend pass; contact Yooy Nelson, (503) 252-8300; e-mail: info@gemfaire.com; Web site: www.gemfaire.com

26-27–COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO: Show, “Rock Fair at WMMI”; Colorado Springs Mineralogical Society; Western Museum of Mining and Industry, 225 N. Gate Blvd.; Sat. 9-4, Sun. 9-3; adults $5, children $2; vendors, rocks, minerals, jewelry, children’s area, rock, mineral and fossil identification, speakers, demonstrations, gold panning, metal detecting; contact Ronald “Yam” Yamiolkoski, (719) 488-5526; e-mail: info@csms.us; Web site: www.csms.us

26-27–GILSUM, NEW HAMPSHIRE: Show, “Gilsum Rock Swap and Mineral Show”; Town of Gilsum; Gilsum Elementary School, Rte. 10; Sat. 8-6, Sun. 8-4; free admission; more than 60 dealers, buy, sell or swap, beryl, quartz crystals, semiprecious stones, rocks, minerals, displays (specimens, fossils, hand-crafted jewelry); contact Rob Mitchell, Gilsum Recreation Committee, P.O. Box 76, Gilsum, NH 03448, (603) 357-9636; e-mail: gilsumrocks@gmail.com

26-27–OSAGE BEACH, MISSOURI: 9th annual show; Osage Rock & Mineral Club; The Inn At Grand Glaize, 5142 Hwy. 54; Sat. 11-5, Sun. 11-5; gemstones, jewelry, meteorites, geodes, fossils, minerals, quartz crystals, custom jewelry, cabochons, gift items, demonstrations, displays, kids’ games, prizes; adults $2, seniors (60+) and kids 10 and younger $1; Scouts in uniform free, families $5 maximum; contact ORMC, (417) 532-4367, or Roger Varvel; e-mail: rvarvel@fidnet.com

26-27–RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA: 30th anniversary show; Western Dakota Gem & Mineral Society; Rushmore Plaza Civic Center, 444 N. Mt. Rushmore Rd.; Sat. 9-6, Sun. 10-4; adults $3, children under 12 free; dealers, gems, minerals, fossils, jewelry, silent auction, informational programs; contact Jamie Brezina, (605) 415-6283, or Deb Radomski, (605) 343-7850; Web site: www.wdgms.org

26-27–STATE COLLEGE, PENNSYLVANIA: Nittany Gem & Mineral Show; Nittany Mineralogical Society; Mt. Nittany Middle School, 656 Brandywine Dr.; Sat. 10-6, Sun. 11-4; adults $5, seniors and students $2, children 12 and under free with adult; expert speakers, hands-on activities, demonstrations, displays, Pennsylvania mineral specimen contest, club silent auctions with kids’ sections, field trips; contact David Glick, 209 Spring Lea Dr., State College, PA 16801; e-mail: xidg@verizon.net; Web site: www.ems.psu.edu/nms/

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JUNE-JULY 2010:

30-4–MADRAS, OREGON: 61st show; All Rockhounds Pow Wow Club of America; Jefferson County Fairgrounds; free admission; swap tables, door prizes, rock toss, auction, members-only field trips daily, more than 70 vendors, jewelry, faceted gemstones, minerals, fossils, crystals, findings, equipment; contact Pauline Miller, (360) 658-8091; e-mail: paulinem280@aol.com

Thanks for the list: http://www.rockngem.com/showdates.asp