RockHoundBlog

Roger Weller, Geology Instructor- Cochise College. Interview and Site History.

Filed under: interviews(new),regular postings — Gary January 13, 2007 @ 8:23 pm

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Pictures: R.Weller/Cochise College.

I was able to interview Roger Weller, an excellent source of mineral knowledge I must say! One of the great things he is doing that I must point out is he is getting his students to put their term papers on the net so anyone can learn, here is what he said-

” It always bothered me that student term papers were tossed away after they were graded. This is a terrible waste of human effort. By having students create geology web pages in place of term papers, they can share their discoveries and efforts with the rest of the world.”

About his site:

There are several reasons why I started my geology website:
1. I have a large collection of Bisbee minerals and I wanted to share it with others.
2. I disliked the high price of geology textbooks and the fact that they are changing every 18 months, so the students couldn’t resell them.


3. My slide collection is getting old, so I can preserve it on the Internet.
4. I am using the Internet with a computer and projector in my classroom in order to teach geology. Placing geology maps on the Internet saves lots of storage space.
5. I have the opportunity to tour the Tucson gem and mineral shows, which many in the country never have the chance.
6. The geology of southeastern Arizona is very interesting, but it was not available on the Internet.
7. It always bothered me that student term papers were tossed away after they were graded. This is a terrible waste of human effort. By having students create geology web pages in place of term papers, they can share their discoveries and efforts with the rest of the world.
8. I am attempting to provide an example of how the Internet should be used in education. By making information easily available in an organized manner, the level of education can be raised. Hopefully, this will encourage other educators to share their knowledge.
9. The Internet is terribly disorganized and many websites are unreliable. I organized the best of the websites into an easy to find collections.

Index of Minerals

Number of photos: 1489 Number of minerals: 251
Best viewed with Internet Explorer
Photos are copyright free for non-commercial educational uses.
Just credit photos to R.Weller/Cochise College.

http://skywalker.cochise.edu/wellerr/mineral/minlist.htm

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Since October 2005, I have been keeping statistics on the use of my website
Statistics
Cities of Visitors-USA
Cities of Visitors-non-USA
I know that my website is being used around the world.

My immediate goal is reach 10,000 geology photos on my website before I retire (maybe in 3 years).

I started collecting minerals at age 8 and I learned how to polish stones during cub scouts.
I have a M.S. degree in lunar and planetary geology from the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona.
My first job out of college was the curator of the Bisbee Mining and Historical Museum in Bisbee, Arizona.
I have been teaching geology and physics for Cochise College in southeastern Arizona for 33 years.

I haven’t had many finds for the past few years. Collecting areas are drying up.

In Bisbee, a world-class mineral locality, none of minerals are found on the surface. All come from the underground and the mine is closed.
In addition, the mine dumps are closed and guarded.

Most of my hunting for gems and minerals takes place at rock shows.

In my earlier days, I found
calcite geodes in Kentucky
fossil corals in Arkona, Ontario
calcite crystals in Maumee, Ohio
fluorite and selenite at the Penfield Quarry in N.Y.

Large crinoid stems near Syracuse, N.Y.

Celestite crystals from Clay Center, Ohio
copper in northern Michigan
greenstones from Isle Royale in Lake Superior
Herkimer diamonds (quartz crystals)-N.Y.

In recent years, I have been happy to find wonderful geological structures to photograph and add to my website”
folded rocks in the Huachuca Mountains, Arizona
cross bedding in Colorado

fossils in limestone
petrified wood-Petrified Forest, Arizona

Sincerely,

Roger Weller

http://skywalker.cochise.edu/wellerr/aawellerweb.htm Check out his site!

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